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Holy Land Tours

Holy Land Tours

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The Holy City of Jerusalem, where the Temple once stood is home to hundreds of Christian holy sites associated with the Christian world. After all, it is Jerusalem where Jesus brings his disciples to challenge the Judean status quo, where the Last Supper takes place, and it is here where Jesus is arrested, crucified and resurrected. With countless sites to consider visiting during a Christian Holy Land tour, read our guide for our top ten Holy Land sites in Jerusalem.

The Church of Saint Catherine is a 19th- century Roman Catholic Church located adjacent to the Basilica of the Nativity in Bethlehem. The Chapel was built over the cave where Jesus was born, and it even shares a wall with the Basilica of Nativity.

The amazing story of the Oberammergau Passion Play begins in 1633. In the ravages of the Thirty Years’ War, after months of plague, dying, and suffering, the townspeople of Oberammergau made a pledge with God, to act out the suffering, death, and resurrection of the Lord, Jesus Christ once very ten years in a play.

The Monastery of Saint John in the Wilderness is a Franciscan Catholic monastery commemorating the childhood wanderings of John the Baptist in the area. Luke tells us in the scriptures that John "grew and became strong in spirit; and he lived in the desert until he appeared publicly to Israel" (Luke 1:80). Tradition identifies the deserted place where Saint John grew up as the hermitage of Saint John in the Desert, also known as 'Ain el-Habis (spring of the hermit.)  The site is located in the center of the Judean hills, about 1.8 miles from Ein Karem, St. John’s birthplace, which is itself just 4.5 miles west of Jerusalem.

The Church of St. Peter in Gallicantu is located in Jerusalem on a hillside on a slope of Mount Zion. This stunning Roman Catholic church commemorates the triple denial of Jesus by His apostle Peter, his repentance, and reconciliation with Jesus after the Resurrection.

Herodion, which resembles an extinct volcano, has aroused the interest of travelers and scholars since the fifteenth century. It is situated on an artificial hill on the edge of the Judean Desert, twelve km south of Jerusalem and six km southeast of Bethlehem. It incorporates the ruins of a number of impressive palaces built by King Herod between 25 and 15 BCE. This enormous building venture was intended to commemorate not only Herod's name but his triumph over the last Hasmonean king, Antigonus 11 (Mattathias), and his men in 40 BCE. According to the famous historian Josephus, Herod was buried in Herodion, but his grave has not been discovered by archeologists, despite intensive excavations. Josephus' description of Herodion matches the archeological finds at the site: